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Microbial secreted exopolysaccharides affect the hydrological behavior of induced biological soil crusts in desert sandy soils
Colica, Giovanni1; Li, Hua2,3; Rossi, Federico1; Li, Dunhai2; Liu, Yongding2; De Philippis, Roberto1; De Philippis, R.(roberto.dephilippis@unifi.it)
2014
Source PublicationSOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY
ISSN0038-0717
Volume68Issue:-Pages:62-70
AbstractThe effect of the presence of microbial secreted exopolysaccharides (EPSs) on the hydraulic conductivity, water capture and moisture retaining capabilities of Induced Biological Soil Crusts (IBSCs) was investigated. In the experimental sites under study, located in Hobq Desert (China), the formation of these IBSCs was induced three to eight years before the tests by a massive inoculation in sandy soils of mixed cultures of Microcoleus vaginatus and Scytonema javanicum. In all the sites under study, the IBSCs showed to be well consolidated and differently developed in relation with their age. All the crust samples showed a significant content of EPSs, which contributed to the structure of the crusts. The hydraulic conductivity (HC) was significantly lower in the IBSCs than in the underlying bare soil and a statistically significant negative correlation between HC and the amount of high molecular weight (>100kDa; HMW) and of low molecular weight (<100kDa; LMW) carbohydrates in IBSCs was found. The capability of the crusts to retain moisture, coupled with the preservation of their structural integrity, was found to be positively correlated with the amount of total and of HMW carbohydrates in IBSCs. The uptake of atmospheric humidity showed a positive correlation with the amount of LMW carbohydrates in destructured IBSCs. In conclusion, this study showed the crucial role played by the EPSs of IBSCs in trapping and retaining humidity in sandy soils, thus increasing the water availability in the first layers of sandy soils and reducing water infiltration, protecting the soil from erosion. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.; The effect of the presence of microbial secreted exopolysaccharides (EPSs) on the hydraulic conductivity, water capture and moisture retaining capabilities of Induced Biological Soil Crusts (IBSCs) was investigated. In the experimental sites under study, located in Hobq Desert (China), the formation of these IBSCs was induced three to eight years before the tests by a massive inoculation in sandy soils of mixed cultures of Microcoleus vaginatus and Scytonema javanicum. In all the sites under study, the IBSCs showed to be well consolidated and differently developed in relation with their age. All the crust samples showed a significant content of EPSs, which contributed to the structure of the crusts. The hydraulic conductivity (HC) was significantly lower in the IBSCs than in the underlying bare soil and a statistically significant negative correlation between HC and the amount of high molecular weight (>100 kDa; HMW) and of low molecular weight (<100 kDa; LMW) carbohydrates in IBSCs was found. The capability of the crusts to retain moisture, coupled with the preservation of their structural integrity, was found to be positively correlated with the amount of total and of HMW carbohydrates in IBSCs. The uptake of atmospheric humidity showed a positive correlation with the amount of LMW carbohydrates in destructured IBSCs. In conclusion, this study showed the crucial role played by the EPSs of IBSCs in trapping and retaining humidity in sandy soils, thus increasing the water availability in the first layers of sandy soils and reducing water infiltration, protecting the soil from erosion. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
SubtypeArticle
KeywordHydraulic Conductivity Moisture Uptake Water Retaining Capability Exocellular Polysaccharides Induced Biological Soil Crusts High Molecular Weight Carbohydrates Low Molecular Weight Carbohydrates Cyanobacteria Microbial Community
Department(1) Department of Agrifood Production and Environmental Sciences, University of Florence, Piazzale delle Cascine 24, Firenze I-50144, Italy; (2) Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 7 South Donghu Road, Wuhan 430072, China; (3) Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, China; (4) Earth and Life Institute (ELI), Group of Bioengineering (GEBI), Universite Catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
DOI10.1016/j.soilbio.2013.09.017
WOS HeadingsScience & Technology ; Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS Research AreaAgriculture
WOS SubjectSoil Science
WOS IDWOS:000329536200009
WOS KeywordALGAL CRUSTS ; CYANOBACTERIAL EXOPOLYSACCHARIDES ; HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY ; ECOSYSTEM PROCESSES ; INNER-MONGOLIA ; WATER EROSION ; STABILITY ; GLOMALIN ; BIOFILMS ; SUBSTANCES
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Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.ihb.ac.cn/handle/342005/19940
Collection水环境工程研究中心_期刊论文
Corresponding AuthorDe Philippis, R.(roberto.dephilippis@unifi.it)
Affiliation1.Univ Florence, Dept Agrifood Prod & Environm Sci, I-50144 Florence, Italy
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Hydrobiol, Wuhan 430072, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Sci, Grad Univ, Beijing 100039, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Colica, Giovanni,Li, Hua,Rossi, Federico,et al. Microbial secreted exopolysaccharides affect the hydrological behavior of induced biological soil crusts in desert sandy soils[J]. SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY,2014,68(-):62-70.
APA Colica, Giovanni.,Li, Hua.,Rossi, Federico.,Li, Dunhai.,Liu, Yongding.,...&De Philippis, R..(2014).Microbial secreted exopolysaccharides affect the hydrological behavior of induced biological soil crusts in desert sandy soils.SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY,68(-),62-70.
MLA Colica, Giovanni,et al."Microbial secreted exopolysaccharides affect the hydrological behavior of induced biological soil crusts in desert sandy soils".SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY 68.-(2014):62-70.
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