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Solar UV radiation drives CO2 fixation in marine phytoplankton: A double-edged sword
Gao, Kunshan; Wu, Yaping; Li, Gang; Wu, Hongyan; Villafane, Virginia E.; Helbling, E. Walter; Gao, KS, Shantou Univ, Inst Marine Biol, Shantou 515063, Guangdong, Peoples R China
2007-05-01
Source PublicationPLANT PHYSIOLOGY
ISSN0032-0889
Volume144Issue:1Pages:54-59
AbstractPhotosynthesis by phytoplankton cells in aquatic environments contributes to more than 40% of the global primary production (Behrenfeld et al., 2006). Within the euphotic zone (down to 1% of surface photosynthetically active radiation [PAR]), cells are exposed not only to PAR (400-700 nm) but also to UV radiation (UVR; 280-400 nm) that can penetrate to considerable depths (Hargreaves, 2003). In contrast to PAR, which is energizing to photosynthesis, UVR is usually regarded as a stressor (Hader, 2003) and suggested to affect CO2-concentrating mechanisms in phytoplankton (Beardall et al., 2002). Solar UVR is known to reduce photosynthetic rates (Steemann Nielsen, 1964; Helbling et al., 2003), and damage cellular components such as D1 proteins (Sass et al., 1997) and DNA molecules (Buma et al., 2003). It can also decrease the growth (Villafane et al., 2003) and alter the rate of nutrient uptake (Fauchot et al., 2000) and the fatty acid composition (Goes et al., 1994) of phytoplankton. Recently, it has been found that natural levels of UVR can alter the morphology of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis (Wu et al., 2005b). On the other hand, positive effects of UVR, especially of UV- A (315-400 nm), have also been reported. UV- A enhances carbon fixation of phytoplankton under reduced (Nilawati et al., 1997; Barbieri et al., 2002) or fast-fluctuating (Helbling et al., 2003) solar irradiance and allows photorepair of UV- B-induced DNA damage (Buma et al., 2003). Furthermore, the presence of UV-A resulted in higher biomass production of A. platensis as compared to that under PAR alone (Wu et al., 2005a). Energy of UVR absorbed by the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries was found to cause fluorescence (Orellana et al., 2004). In addition, fluorescent pigments in corals and their algal symbiont are known to absorb UVR and play positive roles for the symbiotic photosynthesis and photoprotection (Schlichter et al., 1986; Salih et al., 2000). However, despite the positive effects that solar UVR may have on aquatic photosynthetic organisms, there is no direct evidence to what extent and howUVR per se is utilized by phytoplankton. In addition, estimations of aquatic biological production have been carried out in incubations considering only PAR (i. e. using UV-opaque vials made of glass or polycarbonate; Donk et al., 2001) without UVR being considered (Hein and Sand-Jensen, 1997; Schippers and Lurling, 2004). Here, we have found that UVR can act as an additional source of energy for photosynthesis in tropical marine phytoplankton, though it occasionally causes photoinhibition at high PAR levels. While UVR is usually thought of as damaging, our results indicate that UVR can enhance primary production of phytoplankton. Therefore, oceanic carbon fixation estimates may be underestimated by a large percentage if UVR is not taken into account.; Photosynthesis by phytoplankton cells in aquatic environments contributes to more than 40% of the global primary production (Behrenfeld et al., 2006). Within the euphotic zone (down to 1% of surface photosynthetically active radiation [PAR]), cells are exposed not only to PAR (400-700 nm) but also to UV radiation (UVR; 280-400 nm) that can penetrate to considerable depths (Hargreaves, 2003). In contrast to PAR, which is energizing to photosynthesis, UVR is usually regarded as a stressor (Hader, 2003) and suggested to affect CO2-concentrating mechanisms in phytoplankton (Beardall et al., 2002). Solar UVR is known to reduce photosynthetic rates (Steemann Nielsen, 1964; Helbling et al., 2003), and damage cellular components such as D1 proteins (Sass et al., 1997) and DNA molecules (Buma et al., 2003). It can also decrease the growth (Villafane et al., 2003) and alter the rate of nutrient uptake (Fauchot et al., 2000) and the fatty acid composition (Goes et al., 1994) of phytoplankton. Recently, it has been found that natural levels of UVR can alter the morphology of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis (Wu et al., 2005b). On the other hand, positive effects of UVR, especially of UV- A (315-400 nm), have also been reported. UV- A enhances carbon fixation of phytoplankton under reduced (Nilawati et al., 1997; Barbieri et al., 2002) or fast-fluctuating (Helbling et al., 2003) solar irradiance and allows photorepair of UV- B-induced DNA damage (Buma et al., 2003). Furthermore, the presence of UV-A resulted in higher biomass production of A. platensis as compared to that under PAR alone (Wu et al., 2005a). Energy of UVR absorbed by the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries was found to cause fluorescence (Orellana et al., 2004). In addition, fluorescent pigments in corals and their algal symbiont are known to absorb UVR and play positive roles for the symbiotic photosynthesis and photoprotection (Schlichter et al., 1986; Salih et al., 2000). However, despite the positive effects that solar UVR may have on aquatic photosynthetic organisms, there is no direct evidence to what extent and howUVR per se is utilized by phytoplankton. In addition, estimations of aquatic biological production have been carried out in incubations considering only PAR (i. e. using UV-opaque vials made of glass or polycarbonate; Donk et al., 2001) without UVR being considered (Hein and Sand-Jensen, 1997; Schippers and Lurling, 2004). Here, we have found that UVR can act as an additional source of energy for photosynthesis in tropical marine phytoplankton, though it occasionally causes photoinhibition at high PAR levels. While UVR is usually thought of as damaging, our results indicate that UVR can enhance primary production of phytoplankton. Therefore, oceanic carbon fixation estimates may be underestimated by a large percentage if UVR is not taken into account.
SubtypeArticle
Keywordb Radiation Ultraviolet-radiation Light-intensity Photosystem-ii Photosynthesis Productivity Pigment Red Absorption Platensis
DepartmentShantou Univ, Inst Marine Biol, Shantou 515063, Guangdong, Peoples R China; Xiamen Univ, State Key Lab Marine Environm Sci, Xiamen 361005, Peoples R China; Chinese Acad Sci, State Key Lab Freshwater Ecol & Biotechnol, Inst Hydrobiol, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China; Estac Fotobiol Playa Union, RA-9103 Chubut, Argentina; Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, RA-9103 Chubut, Argentina
Subject AreaPlant Sciences
DOI10.1104/pp.107.098491
WOS HeadingsScience & Technology ; Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS Research AreaPlant Sciences
WOS SubjectPlant Sciences
WOS IDWOS:000246356300006
WOS KeywordB RADIATION ; ULTRAVIOLET-RADIATION ; LIGHT-INTENSITY ; PHOTOSYSTEM-II ; PHOTOSYNTHESIS ; PRODUCTIVITY ; PIGMENT ; RED ; ABSORPTION ; PLATENSIS
Citation statistics
Cited Times:130[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.ihb.ac.cn/handle/152342/8588
Collection期刊论文
Corresponding AuthorGao, KS, Shantou Univ, Inst Marine Biol, Shantou 515063, Guangdong, Peoples R China
Affiliation1.Shantou Univ, Inst Marine Biol, Shantou 515063, Guangdong, Peoples R China
2.Xiamen Univ, State Key Lab Marine Environm Sci, Xiamen 361005, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Sci, State Key Lab Freshwater Ecol & Biotechnol, Inst Hydrobiol, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China
4.Estac Fotobiol Playa Union, RA-9103 Chubut, Argentina
5.Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, RA-9103 Chubut, Argentina
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Gao, Kunshan,Wu, Yaping,Li, Gang,et al. Solar UV radiation drives CO2 fixation in marine phytoplankton: A double-edged sword[J]. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY,2007,144(1):54-59.
APA Gao, Kunshan.,Wu, Yaping.,Li, Gang.,Wu, Hongyan.,Villafane, Virginia E..,...&Gao, KS, Shantou Univ, Inst Marine Biol, Shantou 515063, Guangdong, Peoples R China.(2007).Solar UV radiation drives CO2 fixation in marine phytoplankton: A double-edged sword.PLANT PHYSIOLOGY,144(1),54-59.
MLA Gao, Kunshan,et al."Solar UV radiation drives CO2 fixation in marine phytoplankton: A double-edged sword".PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 144.1(2007):54-59.
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